Noah’s Raven Now Available

My new book Noah’s Raven is now available for purchase from Amazon!

A future-set novel written in two alternating parts, Noah’s Raven is the story of Maddie Scarlet, a thrill-seeker on the edge of destruction, and Ezra Miller, an Amish farmer who turns his faith toward astronomy. Their parallel journeys ignite one of the most radical events in human history.

With a forward by Kim Stanley Robinson, author of the Mars trilogy, Noah’s Raven is a “startling and moving” narrative that I hope you will enjoy and share.

Click to order Noah’s Raven on Amazon

Kickstarter Campaign: Noah’s Raven

This month I am writing the draft of a new novel titled Noah’s Raven as part of National Novel Writing Month. Noah’s Raven is set in a future where geoengineering reigns and tells the story of Maddie Scarlet, a thrill-seeker on the edge of destruction, and Ezra Miller, an Amish farmer turned astronomer, and their faith in an imminent message from extraterrestrial life.

I am simultaneously running a Kickstarter campaign to build an audience for the book and raise funds for publication. The crowdfunding page has been active for just a few days, and I’ve already had several backers and have until December 4th to meet my goal. Pre-order your copy of Noah’s Raven today, and help spread the word!

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/haqqmisra/noahs-raven

Should We Transmit Into Space?

Deliberate and unintended radio transmissions from Earth propagate into space. Deliberate transmissions are intended as attempts to send messages to potential extraterrestrial watchers (known as “Messaging to Extraterrestrial Intelligence”, or METI). Unintended radio leakage includes television and radio broadcasts, cell phone networks, and high-power military and astronomical radars. This radiation gives evidence of our technological civilization to any extraterrestrial watchers.

Do radio transmissions pose a risk and should they continue? I recently published a paper with a team of BMSIS scientists in the journal Space Policy that examines the various benefits and harms that could arise as a result of human transmissions into space. In general, we think that the value of radio communication on Earth today is too large to justify ceasing all radio transmissions in order to reduce the risk of being found by a hypothetical harmful extraterrestrial civilization.

Most deliberate METI transmissions are detectable over much smaller volumes than the radio leakage. These transmissions are either short in duration or use a high bandwidth, in contrast to television carrier waves or high-power radars. These transmissions do not increase the probability of contact with extraterrestrial civilization. Such METI attempts are also valuable for education and public outreach efforts on Earth and for developing scientific groundwork for future METI projects. Given the modest costs associated with METI at low levels of detectability, we think that such projects should continue.

In contrast, high-power and persistent METI projects could have detectable volumes greater than the radio leakage, and would have a greater probability of being detected by any extraterrestrial watchers. The consequences of contact with extraterrestrials are highly uncertain, so we cannot say with confidence whether or not such attempts at METI should proceed. One additional benefit of transmitting messages into space at high power is that they serve a purpose analogous to digital time capsules, preserving the knowledge of human civilization, should our species become extinct. This may provide an additional justification for engaging in METI; however, the cost of maintaining such a long duration beacon must be weighed against the long-term benefits.

Existing governing structures or treaties are currently lacking for METI. Active engagement in long-term METI would benefit from international cooperation in order to accurately represent Earth and humanity and to better understand how to communicate effectively with an unknown observer.

Sending Messages Into Space

One possibility for communicating across the vast distances of space is the use of radio or other electromagnetic waves. Human civilization already posses the technology to broadcast and receive signals at many wavelengths. If other extraterrestrial civilizations exist in the galaxy, then it is possible that they could develop similar capabilities. Based on this premise, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) has scanned the sky for over fifty years now to look for any such signals. Along similar lines, a handful of attempts at messaging to extraterrestrial intelligence (METI) have been undertaken in recent years, with hopes of being picked up by an extraterrestrial listener. The content of these messages has increased in complexity and content, though, which may produce cryptic messages that are disorganized or difficult to decipher.

In a recent paper published in the journal Space Policy, my co-authors Dimitra Atri and Julia DeMarines and I propose the development of a METI protocol in order to guide the construction and transmission of messages to extraterrestrials. A METI protocol would include technical considerations such as the method of signal encoding, message length, and transmission strategy. This protocol would also provide guidelines for the content of messages, which includes limits on culturally-dependent, anthropocentric, or sense-dependent information. This will help ensure that a message into space is more representative of Earth as a whole and may also increase the likelihood that the message is understood by potential listeners.

As a way of testing messages and promoting educational outreach, we will implement an interactive website in which users can attempt to submit or decrypt messages according to a METI protocol. This will allow messages to be tested across cultural borders, which arguably is a minimum requirement for a message that would be sent to unknown extraterrestrial listeners. Such an exchange will also help users of the website to gain insight into cultures other than their own by discovering success or failure at effectively communicating a message to unknown receivers on Earth.