Fluctuations for Planets Around Binaries

Planets orbiting a binary pair of stars continue to be discovered by astronomers. Earth-like planets that could host liquid water, and perhaps life, may be just as likely to occur in a binary system as a single star system.

The two stars in the binary pair orbit around each other, while the planet orbits them both. This leads to a situation where the amount of radiation from each star changes by a small amount as the planet moves, causing an increase and then decrease in the starlight received with time. If this effect is too extreme, then it could potentially prevent such planets from maintaining liquid water on their surfaces.

My co-authors and I address this problem in a paper entitled “Constraining the magnitude of climate extremes from time-varying instellation on a circumbinary planet” and published in Journal of Geophysical Research – Planets. We use a simple climate model to calculate the maximum temperature that could be expected for the most extreme, but physically possible, case of a planet orbiting a binary pair. Even in the most extreme cases, we find that such a planet would be able to support liquid water in at least some parts of its surface.

Rather than sterilize the planet, the temperature variation from a binary pair acts more like a driver of seasons. Planets orbiting a binary pair may therefore experience unique seasons and weather patterns, but these would not be strong enough to make life impossible.

Greenhouse Warming on Earth’s Past, Present, and Future

Carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere provides an important regulator of climate. Without it, or with too little, Earth would be completely frozen. But the rapid rise in carbon dioxide in recent times due to fossil fuel consumption and changes in land use has caused unprecedented warming with consequences to human civilization.

Understanding how Earth’s climate responds to atmospheric carbon dioxide is an important problem not only for anthropogenic climate change today but also for understanding Earth’s distant past (when the sun was fainter than today) and distant future (when the sun becomes brighter than today). In a paper by Eric Wolf, Brian Toon, and myself titled “Evaluating climate Sensitivity to CO2 across Earth’s history” and published in Journal of Geophysical Research – Atmospheres, we calculate the expected warming for early-, modern-, and future-Earth scenarios across a much wider range of carbon dioxide levels than typically considered for present-day climate change. We show that a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide would have caused a greater amount of warming on early Earth (when the carbon dioxide fraction of the atmosphere was high) compared to today (when carbon dioxide is a trace constituent). In general the amount of warming to be expected from such a carbon dioxide doubling (known as the “climate sensitivity”) depends upon the amount of solar energy received, the starting carbon dioxide budget, and the mean temperature of the planet.