A Lunar Telescope Might Help Us Find Aliens

One way to search for extraterrestrial life is to look for tell-tale signs of biology in the atmospheres of planets orbiting other star systems. Such a “biosignature” that shows the simultaneous presence of oxygen, water vapor, and methane, for example, would be consistent with the presence of surface life on a planet. Observing biosignatures on other planets is a difficult feat, but current and future ground- and space-based telescopes are gradually enabling these observations.

Another place to build a telescope for observing biosignatures is the moon. Stoney Simons and I explore this idea in a recent paper titled “A trip to the moon might constrain the Fermi Paradox,” which is part of the Futures special issue on the Detectability of Future Earth. The moon’s negligible atmosphere makes observations much easier than ground-based astronomy, particularly at the mid-infrared wavelengths needed to detect possible biosignatures.

Searching for biosignatures in the infrared provides a quantitative method of constraining the abundance of life in the galaxy. Likewise, the possibility of observing “technosignatures” in the atmospheres of distant planets could betray the presence of extraterrestrial intelligence. Actually finding any definitive biosignatures or technosignatures will require at least a couple more decades of observing, but we suggest that a lunar observatory should remain an option for contributing to this search.

Is Climate Change Ever Good?

The cumulative effects of human actions over past centuries such as widespread deforestation and the abundant use of fossil fuels has caused changes in the present climate state that would otherwise not have occurred. This trend of an increase in the global average temperature shows no evidence of slowing into the future, which suggests that uncomfortable climate change will persist in the centuries to come. Most of the problematic aspects of climate change involve its negative impact on humans. This includes shifts in farmable regions of the world, destabilization of parts of the world due to fluctuating food prices, changes in flooding and drought patterns, and forced migration due to sea level rise.

A warming planet might pose problems for humans, but how would climate change affect the welfare of other species on Earth? In a recent paper titled “Is climate change morally good from non-anthropocentric perspectives?” and published in Ethics, Policy and Environment, Toby Svoboda and I examine the impact of climate change on non-human organisms. If we temporarily set aside the interests of humans, might it be possible that climate change provides net benefits to other organisms?

The context of this study is the belief by some people in “nonanthropocentrism” or “anti-humanism” as a philosophy. Such beliefs tend to place human interests beneath those of other organisms in Earth’s community of life. If such philosophical positions are accepted at face value, then this might suggest that climate change is in fact a good thing. Climate change might cause the decline of civilization and even a reduction in biodiversity, but it might allow other organisms to flourish as a result. The net effect could be a much more thriving planet, albeit one in which humans are worse off.

This is not to say that we should ignore the effects of climate change on humans. Instead, this analysis demonstrates that nonanthropocentrism and anti-humanism may be in conflict with modern attempts at mitigating climate change. Our analysis therefore challenges adherents of nonanthropocentric ethics to examine the extent to which non-human interests should take priority over the collective interests of human civilization.

Exomoon Atmospheres

As astronomers continue to search for potentially habitable planets orbiting other stars, some have also started to consider the possibility of habitable moons orbiting giant planets in such systems. Such exomoons could be the size of Mars, Earth, or even a few times larger, based on observations of similar large moons orbiting Jupiter and Saturn. A few scientific studies have demonstrated that exomoons should be expected in other planetary systems and could even be observable with the next generation of space telescopes.

I recently published a paper with RenĂ© Heller in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society titled “Exploring exomoon atmospheres with an idealized general circulation model.” This study presents the first three-dimensional climate modeling of exomoon atmospheres. Exomoon atmospheres receive daily instellation from the host star of the planetary system, which would make them similar in climate to an Earth-like planet. But exomoons are also in synchronous rotation with the host giant planet (similar to the synchronous rotation of our moon around Earth). Exomoons therefore receive additional thermal energy at the top of their atmospheres from their host planet, in addition to the star. This configuration leads to a climate with warmer poles (a phenomenon known as “polar amplification”) and stronger dynamical energy transport.

Some exomoons atmospheres could enter a runaway greenhouse from the additional thermal energy of the host planet, but others should be able to maintain stable and potentially habitable atmospheres. Exomoons remain viable prospects in the search for life, and future astronomical surveys will gradually reveal the frequency of such worlds.

Now Curating Games on Steam

If you fancy yourself a gamer, then follow along with my reviews on Steam. As a lifelong video game enthusiast with roots in the NES era, I’ve enjoyed immersing myself in the vibrant community of modern indie gaming.

My reviews only feature games playable through Linux with full controller support. I focus primarily on games from small and independent developers in the role playing game, point-and-click, action-adventure, and puzzle-platformer genres. And with a bit of aesthetic discourse added into the mix, we get my aptly-named steam curator: Linux Gaming Philosophy.