Circulation States of Synchronous Rotators

Some planets around low mass stars are expected to be in synchronous rotation, so that the star is continually fixed upon one side. This not only causes one hemisphere to experience permanent day and the other to reside in permanent night (with perpetual twilight along the “terminator” at the edges), but this also drives the climate into a regime fundamentally unlike any seen in the atmosphere of Earth.

In a recent paper titled, “Demarcating circulation regimes of synchronously rotating terrestrial planets within the habitable zone,” my co-authors and I analyze a set of climate model calculations to examine the dependence upon stellar effective temperature of the atmospheric dynamics of planets as they move closer to the inner edge of the
habitable zone. These results show that the surface temperature contrast between day and night hemispheres decreases with an increase in incident stellar flux. This trend is opposite that seen on gas giants, where the same forcing shows an increase in the day-night atmosphere temperature contrast.

We define three dynamical regimes in terms of the dynamical quantities known as the Rossby deformation radius (the ratio of buoyancy to rotation) and the Rhines length (the maximum extent of turbulent structures). The slow rotation regime is characterized by a mean zonal circulation that spans from the day to night side. Slow rotation requires that both the Rossby deformation radius and the Rhines length exceed planetary radius, which occurs for planets with rotation rate > 20 days. Rapid rotators show a mean zonal circulation that only partially spans a hemisphere, with banded cloud formation beneath the substellar point. The rapid rotation regime is defined by the Rossby deformation radius being less than planetary radius, which occurs for planets with rotation rate < 5 days. In between is the Rhines rotation regime, which retains a mean zonal circulation from day to night side but also features midlatitude turbulence-driven zonal jets. Rhines rotators are expected for planets with rotation rate between 5 to 20 days, where the Rhines length is less than planetary radius but the Rossby deformation radius is greater than planetary radius. The dynamical state can be inferred from observations of orbital period and spectral type of the host star as well as from comparing the morphology of the thermal emission phase curves of synchronously rotating planets. Such phase curves will be potentially useful tools for characterizing planets with the next generation of space telescopes.